Out first preview night by the Londonist! The last days of limehouse.

PREVIEW: THE LAST DAYS OF LIMEHOUSE

It was so delightful to see everyone enjoyed themselves last night. OUR FIRST SHOW

What’s more it was mostly positive reviews, great acting, thoroughly enjoyed it.. and best comment we lifted the play off the page! Well done to everyone to all the actors , crew and directors, producers, marketing,wardrobe and make up, marketing but most remarkable of them all, the stage management!

Looking forward to the next 9 shows.

So book your tickets now..

http://www.halfmoon.org.uk/events/the-last-days-of-limehouse/

Nirvana Quartz and the Yellow Earth Theatre.

I am happy to announce my first performance with the Yellow Earth Theatre in a promenade play called; ‘The last days of Limehouse.’ By Jeremy Tiang.

 http://www.halfmoon.org.uk/events/the-last-days-of-limehouse/

Discover life in London's original Chinatown...

Discover life in London’s original Chinatown…

It's hard work having fun.. but the rehearsing is very intensive..

It’s hard work having fun.. but the rehearsing is very intensive..

Just a small part of the group that will be participating in the play..

Just a small part of the group that will be participating in the play..

Nirvana will be taking part in a play.. called The last Days of Limehouse. By Jeremy Tiang. The play is about a East Asian family living in the East London (Limehouse) during the late 1950’s. Few people today know there was once a thriving Chinatown in London’s East End. Yellow Earth’s new production will take you on a journey into this forgotten world… It starts in Limehouse in 1958 when the local council is planning to bulldoze the last remnants of Limehouse Chinatown. As the local people decide how to embrace this redevelopment without losing their heritage, former Limehouse resident Eileen Cunningham returns to start a revolution…. This promenade production at historic Limehouse Town Hall will take you into the heart of London’s original Chinatown, exploding the lurid myths of opium dens and sinister Chinese gangs, to reveal a place that was for generations of people, simply home. Wed 16 July – Sun 3 August Wed-Sat 7.30pm Sun 5pm Tickets £15 Concessions £10 Groups of 10 or more £10ea (Book by phone only) Special family friendly performances In this special interactive performance for children and families, come and meet Limehouse Chinatown characters from the past – Stanley Lo the Sailor, Francis Foong the Sunday School Teacher and Johnny the Chef. Find out what Pukka Pu was and have a Chinese lesson with Mrs Foong. Saturdays 19 & 26 July and 2 August 3pm All tickets £6 Limehouse Town Hall 646 Commercial Road E14 7HA 5min walk from Limehouse DLR station Tickets are available from the Half Moon Theatre Telephone 020 7709 8900 Open 10am – 6pm Mon to Fri Book Online http://www.halfmoon.org.uk Tickets may also be purchased for cash only at Limehouse Town Hall from 30mins before each performance.This is a promenade performance so remember to wear comfortable shoes.

MaptoLimehouse

http://www.halfmoon.org.uk/events/the-last-days-of-limehouse/

 

There are approximately 20 steps up to the main performance area. With Jonathan Chan, Sara Houghton, Matthew Leonhart, Amanda Maud & Gabby Wong Written by Jeremy Tiang Directed by Kumiko Mendl & Gary Merry Design by Moi Tran Music by Ruth Chan Lighting by Pablo Fernandez Baz Projection & Video by Eva Auster In association with Half Moon Theatre Supported by;

In association with Half Moon Theatre Supported by

In association with Half Moon Theatre
Supported by

Gongs, Long Hair and Chewing Gums

Nirvana Q:

And I wonder why Singaporeans are so unhappy?

Originally posted on Remember Singapore:

What do gongs, long hair and chewing gums have in common?

They were all part of a list of items that were either permanently banned or disallowed in public for a period of time in Singapore. Some banned items contained dangerous elements, while others were associated with excessive contents of sex and violence that challenged the society’s moral standards. Banning of certain publications was common. For example, a Hong Kong comic, popular among Singapore students who would spend their pocket money to buy at the roadside stalls, was banned in 1966 due to its undesirable storyline filled with violence, gangsterism and fantasy.

So other than drugs and gambling, what had been banned in Singapore since the sixties?

Playboy Magazines

As part of the “anti-yellow” drive at the start of 1960, the Playboy magazine and its Playmate calender was officially banned in Singapore. Costing $2.10 per copy, the monthly magazine from Chicago…

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